Genei Ibun Roku #FE Dev. Interview (via Nintendo Everything)

This post is just to spread awareness. NintendoEverything (good friends who I have done work with in the past) posted a translated interview with the devs of Genei Ibun Roku #FE that covers what kind of game it might have been at first.

It is interesting for those who are fond of trivia, so I encourage you to head over there to read it when you can. : )

In order to respect their wishes, I will not provided the translation here. Please click here to read the full interview on their site!

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How does Mawile spot the imposter in Chapter 18? – Pokémon Super Mystery Dungeon [JP vs ENG]

 

MawileImposter

Warning: Slight plot spoilers up to the end of Chapter 18 may follow.

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Fire Emblem Fates: Syalla to Rhajat (And other localization questions)

Today is a brief post on a recent Fire Emblem Fates localization development. I already talked all about the Soleil controversy yesterday, but in a related statement, Nintendo revealed a character name, too. So today I wanted to address the character now named “Rhajat.”

In fact I hope to get to other character localization things in the future (Marx to Xander…?) but will focus on this one for now, as it brings up some questions that apply to a few other characters who we do not know the localized names of yet.

Note: Spoilers for some things from the game may follow. Though, nothing about the main plot beyond one very indirect reference will be spoiled, but just in case, please proceed with caution.

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Fire Emblem Fates: Info on the Soleil Controversy

According to Nintendo World Report, Nintendo has decided to change controversial dialogue:

“In the version of the game that ships in the U.S. and Europe, there is no expression which might be considered as gay conversion or drugging that occurs between characters.” a Nintendo representative e-mailed us this morning.

You can read the rest of the summary and news on the above article. This has, of course, rekindled some talk surrounding Fire Emblem Fates’ Soleil. I have been doing translations and such for this game from pre-release all the way to post-release, so I figure I best talk about this too, mostly in an informative way.

UPDATE: The officially localized conversation can be found here.

What I want to talk about in today’s post is where exactly that all started, what was misinterpreted, etc. It’s odd how this all became an issue in the first place, but it seems it did enough for Nintendo to have to directly comment on it… and subsequently alter it to avoid any such controversy.

The post has some spoilers pertaining to her character, but will not spoil the overall game.

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Sigurd 25th Anniversary Artwork (Cleaned)

Fire-Emblem-25th-Anniversary

Today is not exactly a translation, but it does have to do with the Fire Emblem 25th Anniversary book. The book features five special illustrations that have Marth, Sigurd, Eliwood, Ike, and Lucina, each drawn by the same character artists in charge of their respective games.

You may view them on the book’s compilation post here, but I wanted to make individual pages for each one, too.

So, today, I provide Katsuyoshi Koya (character designer in Mystery of the Emblem and Genealogy of the Holy War)’s artwork of Sigurd. I went out of my way to clean it up for people who wanted the artwork.

As you can imagine, the process of doing this all took a lot of time, so if you like what I did, then…

Please donate!

Enjoy!

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Marth 25th Anniversary Artwork (Cleaned)

Fire-Emblem-25th-Anniversary

Today is not exactly a translation, but it does have to do with the Fire Emblem 25th Anniversary book. The book features five special illustrations that have Marth, Sigurd, Eliwood, Ike, and Lucina, each drawn by the same character artists in charge of their respective games.

You may view them on the book’s compilation post here, but I wanted to make individual pages for each one, too.

So, today, I provide Daisuke Izuka (character designer in New Mystery of the Emblem)’s contribution: Marth. I went out of my way to clean it up for people who wanted the artwork.

As you can imagine, the process of doing this all took a lot of time, so if you like what I did, then…

Please donate!

Enjoy!

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Pokémon: “Night Slash” VS “Tsujigiri”

Today’s post is a brief comparison of the Pokémon move name: “Night Slash.” Many have written on the subject already, I’m sure, but I thought to add my own post about it.

This Dark-type move has a rather mundane meaning in English on the surface, but it has quite the dark cultural origins in Japanese. In Japanese, the move is “tsujigiri.” (つじぎり)

Tsujigiri was a practice (and became a way to refer to the practitioners, too) in feudal Japan where samurai would wait by the roadside for unsuspecting individuals to pass by, and ambush them with the intent to kill in order to test out their new swords. It was a way to test how well their new swords could cut.

The rather barbaric practice came about during the chaotic sengoku jidai (warring states period, from 1467-1600) which was when Japan was in a state of anarchy. In 1603, shortly after the unification of Japan and beginning of the tokugawa period, tsujigiri was outlawed and became punishable by death.

Back to Pokémon, with the above in mind, no wonder it’s a dark move! A move with the connotations of lying in wait to ambush, cut, and kill a person simply to test out a new weapon is pretty “evil.” In Japanese, the “dark” type is referred to as the aku (悪 “evil”) type too, and so it makes sense.

In English, the move became “Night Slash.” That has the connotations of attacking and slashing someone in the dark, but the reasoning behind it is left more open-ended (slashing for fun? Out of revenge? etc). The specific act of doing it for a rather trivial matter (i.e. testing out a new sword) is lost in translation.

One can see how “night slash” comes from “tsujigiri” though. Waiting in ambush is likely done in the dark, and a slash is the end result, regardless of whether the opponent dies or not. I see that fans translate tsujigiri to “Crossroad Killing,” which is about the closest anyone can get to describing it in a word or two, but it still loses out on the connotation of just how evil it really is.

In conclusion, when one knows the origins of tsujigiri (and hence night slash), then one can appreciate it for how dark the move really is in both languages. However, for the average player who will not really bother to dig deeper than what is presented, the true meaning will only be presented to the Japanese players aware of the context, and not have as much of am impact aside from sounding “cool” in English.

I wonder what other Pokémon moves to look into that may also have a deeper meaning lost in translation… of course, the localization I think still did a good job considering what they had to work with!