Pokemon: X/Y Battle Chateau – Julia the Robo-Maid [JPN vs ENG]

Not my screenshot.

Yesterday, I looked into a curious man in the Battle Chateau of Pokemon X/Y who keeps saying “Monsieur!” in English. It reminded me that I wanted to look into this other peculiar character, too: Julia, who seems to be a robotic maid of some kind.

Let’s take a look!

Official Localization:

Julia: Vrrrrr… TARGET…ACQUIRED. COMMENCING ATTACK.
Julia: THIS DEVICE IS NOW IN SLEEP MODE. YOU MAY LEAVE A BRIEF MESSAGE AFTER THE BEEP…
Julia: I WAS CREATED SOLELY TO DO BATTLE…
Julia: THIS IS A PART OF ME BROKEN IN OUR BATTLE… YOU SHOULD TAKE IT…

Japanese + Literal Translation:

ジュリア『ウィーン…… ターゲット ハッケン…… コウゲキ カイシ スル……
ジュリア『……ゲンザイ スリープモード デス…… ゴヨウノ カタハ ピーッ ト イウ ハッシンオンノ アトニ……
ジュリア『ワタシハ タタカウ タメ ダケノ メイド……
ジュリア『サキホドノ タタカイ デ コワレタ ワタシノ イチブ ダ…… サア ウケトルガ イイ……

Julia: Beeep… Target Acquired… Commencing attack…
Julia: …Currently in sleep mode… please leave a message after the beep…
Julia: I am a maid solely created to battle*…
Julia: This is a part that fell off of me during battle…you may take it…

*Alternate: “I was maid solely to do battle”

So this translation is 99% accurate, even her name is the same. She really is just a quirky robotic character.

She speaks in all caps likely due to the Japanese only using katakana characters. These characters are often reserved for foreign words these days, but for Japanese readers they will also see it as incredibly quirky. In manga and such, katakana is often used for non-human background noises, too, so gives her a more artificial tone which is what they were going for.

However, one curious thing stuck out. In Japanese, she directly references the fact she is a maid, which is not done in English (of course the player can clearly see that). But the reason I point this out is you can see how the Japanese line actually turns out to be a pun, with the English word “maid” and “made” having the same pronunciation, they are spelled the same way in Japanese when they use the English word, as they did here.

(For instance, WarioWare‘s Japanese title is メイド イン ワリオ (Made in Wario). You can see the characters that spell “made” are the exact same as Julia’s “maid.”)

At the most literal extreme, she is saying “I am a maid that is only [built] for fighting.” But there is no actual verb for built, leaving it as “I am maid for battle.”

Thus the line easily becomes “I was maid solely to do battle.”

It’s strange that we usually associate localization for throwing puns in here and there, but they opted to use “created” in their line. An opportunity missed? Or perhaps they figured a robot wouldn’t be making puns? That’s possible too!

Though we’ll probably never know the answer! It is incredibly trivial after all.

In short:

Julia is accurately translated down to her name. However, the explicit usage of the word “maid” is omitted, when it would have actually made for a workable pun (“I was maid solely to do battle”). While localization is generally associated with putting puns in places where they often aren’t, perhaps in this case they figured a robot would not be making puns in the first place! The caps text are how the localization translated the fact that the Japanese is all in katakana characters. Both give an artificial nature in their respective languages.

Summary infographic:


I will continue to look at fun differences between the versions of sorts of games when I get time!

What do you think of Julia’s dialogue? Would you have done anything different?

Any dialogue you’re interested in? Feel free to send in comments or via email!

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