Zelda: Does Ganondorf have a surname in the Japanese ALttP manual too? [JPN/ENG]

A reader sent me a question a few weeks ago that I had a chance to look into now.

Nintendo updated its Zelda website to include a profile of Ganon that refers to him as “Ganondorf Dragmire.” I heard this was also in A Link to the Past‘s game manual. Was there any mention of the name or some other surname in Japanese?

Zelda Legends thankfully had scanned copies of the manual for the game both in Japanese and English which I used in reference for this post. So let’s take a look:

The dialogue is highlighted in Japanese (left) and English (right).

In Japanese: He is simply ガノンドロフ and ガノン (Ganondorf and Ganon respectively). He has the title of an Evil King/King of Thieves/etc, but no mention of a surname of any sort.

The English above is straightforward, mentioning both Dragmire and Mandrag as other names.

So, no, the Japanese manual did not make a mention of this surname at all, and it is likely a localization creation that the site decided to stick with!


Comparisons are always fun! I hope this post can be used in reference for those who may not be aware of the lack of surname in Japanese.

Let me know if there’s anything you’d love to have looked into. Feel free to leave any comments below!

 

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Legends of Localization Book 1 Out Now! (Happy Thanksgiving!)

This is just an FYI! For anyone who follows this blog, you will know I am an aspiring translator/localizer. If you share a similar interest (or are just a curious mind in seeing Japanese to English comparisons) AND are a fan of the Legend of Zelda series, then this book is for you.

Legends of Localization’s first book has been released, with plenty of goodies for those who place early orders. You can place an order for it yourself here. I highly recommend getting this book to help Clyde (the author) produce more works of similar sorts in the future.

This will be a Happy Thanksgiving indeed! Thanks Clyde!

Legend of Zelda: Tri-Force Heroes NoA VS NoE Localization (1)

There has been a lot of buzz about Tri-Force Hereos’ localization in North America versus that in Europe. A notable example was a meme included in the NoA version that was non existent in the Japanese and NoE versions. This split people down whether it is wise to include a meme into a game and risk losing the “timeless” factor. You can read a great article on Legends of Localization about that.

For me, I’m just looking at other smaller things that still stand out in odd ways. One of my friends is playing through the NoE localized version, and did me a favor and found the same part of the game in NoA. Look at the differences:

TFHComparison1

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