FE Echoes: SoV Localization: Is Lukas different in Japanese? [JPN vs ENG]

This post is part of a series on reader requested (and personal curiosity) comparisons between Fire Emblem games’ Japanese and English scripts.

So here’s a question from a reader:

“Now, I’m curious about Lukas in Shadow of Valentia. I’ve been hearing from people who witnessed his Japanese dialogues and have mentioned that Lukas is more polite and less sarcastic? I’ve been told he’s nicer and more emotional. Is this true?”

Today’s post I compare one scene in particular (requested by the above reader), but there are likely other good candidates to show the differences.

So let’s get to it!

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FE Echoes: SoV Localization: “Ginger Studs,” “Sacks of Guts,” & “Tail Feathers” [JPN vs ENG]

This post is part of a series on reader requested (and personal curiosity) comparisons between Fire Emblem games’ Japanese and English scripts. Last time I covered the “Shut up, Tobin” scene between Gray and Tobin in Shadows of Valentia.

Today’s post has minor spoilers from part one of the game.

This post revolves around the first encounter with the character Python in Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia. A reader contacted me on this blog and requested for me to check a line from this scene.

What’s up with Python calling people studs all the time? How does he speak in Japanese/what led the translators to make the choices they made?

While the reader requested to look into the “studs” specifically, I also look at some other dialogue in the same scene to give a better sense of perhaps what the localization was going for, so it may be a bit broader than this question specifically.

Please remember this is not a nonconstructive criticism of the localization, nor do I aim to purport which is necessarily better or that you should/must like better. Any comments I make along those lines are simply my personal opinion that you can feel free to disagree with as need be. : ) These are fun observations.

Now let’s get to it!

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FE Echoes: SoV Localization: “Shut up, Tobin.” [JPN vs ENG]

This post is part of a series on reader requested (and personal curiosity) comparisons between Fire Emblem games’ Japanese and English scripts. Last time, I covered some dialogue Mae says during her recruitment. This time, I check out a scene with Tobin and Gray.

Today’s post has minor spoilers from part one of the game.

Two readers on twitter requested for me to check a line from Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia:

I think a lot of people would like to hear what Gray’s “shut up Tobin” was in Japanese too. It’s in Act 1, during the visit to the Deliverance Hideout where Clive reunited with Clair. Gray fanboys over him, Tobin questions why he’s revered if he’s losing the war and Gray just says “Shut up, Tobin.”

Please remember this is not a criticism of the localization, nor do I aim to purport which is necessarily better or that you should/must like better. Any comments I make along those lines are simply my personal opinion that you can feel free to disagree with as need be. : )

Now let’s get to it!

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FE Echoes: SoV Localization: “Big Hurty Lightning & Roast Marshmallows?” [JPN vs ENG]

A curious reader sent me a question over on twitter regarding Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia:

Can you take a look at Mae and Boey’s recruitment dialogue in the Japanese version of Echoes? Specifically, “big, hurty lightning” and “roast marshmallows” strike me as lines that weren’t in the original.

I finally got access to the text of both versions of the game, so can now easily compare dialogue. A big thank you for giving the exact words, it made it much easier to find.

If you have any dialogue you want compared for this or any other Fire Emblem game, please feel free to tweet me or send an email!

Now let’s get to it. There are little to no spoilers as this takes place near the start of the game.

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Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia Nintendo Dream Interview (July 2017) [Complete]

I spent the whole last week  translating an interview about  Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia. It was featured in the July 2017 issue of Nintendo Dream (released May 20th, 2017). I had to find and buy the magazine too! This post is the entire interview in one place for your convenience (you may notice the last few days have snippets from it, separating various sections).

A big thanks to VincentASM on serenesforest.net for referring me to the fact that nobody had translated it yet (that we know of). Please link back if you use any part of the interview as I put a lot of time into it. The original Japanese transcript I (re)typed up is available by request.

I recommend reading a previous interview about this game as some things the devs said in it are referenced.

Please note the third section has spoilers. The section has  a clearly marked spoiler warning from the magazine and me, so please be weary.

Lastly, this interview took countless hours of valuable free time to transcribe/translate/edit…  not to mention I had to buy the magazine itself. But I’m glad to have had the opportunity to bring this all to you! If you’re feeling generous and want to help support my passion of translating, please use the button below!

Donate Button

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Is Hidari (the illustrator) a man or a woman? (Answer: He’s a man)

Last week, when I translated the long-awaited Dengeki Interview on Fire Emblem Echoes, I had referred to the character illustrator Hidari as a woman. I was going off of what I had believed and (thought) I had known from before so did not think much of it. When writing the translation, I still tried to look into their gender but could not really find any definitive proof either way (my go-to source, their main website, seems to have been down, and still is as of this writing), so erred on that side.

However, places like wikipedia already referred to him as a “he” and such, but heard some fans were still iffy about trusting that. But I am thankful someone came forward (politely) and pointed out a particular tweet (screen shot in case it goes down) from 2011 where he states he is a man.

Japanese is a language that does not often use gender references in its pronouns at all, which is one of many reasons for this complication in the first place. They do exist, but not often in formal settings, such as an interview.

That tweet the kind reader sent me was still silly in a way, as he uses the female pronoun (あたし) for “I” to say “Though I am a man” which was already a little strange (the rest of the tweet is about drawing female characters and getting the pose down requires some…research… which he makes share not to show anyone else).

But due to that pronoun and dated info, I wanted something more concrete before making this post. So when searching around on the Japanese side of the internet, I did find a picture from an interview with Famitsu (seen below):

The tagline on Famitsu reads: “Hidari (seen on the left)”

It is from the back mostly, but did state directly that is the same illustrator we have in mind, where as other pictures around did not give a definitive answer to that, so I felt this was the best one.

It still was not enough though, so I settled on a different method: I decided to message Hidari on twitter directly!

Here is what I asked (in Japanese, but translated for you):

Hello! My name is Kan. I am a translator.

I have one question for you today. You have a lot of fans in the USA, but some of them still say: “I’m not sure if Hidari is a boy or a girl!” As such, though it may be a bit of a rude question, which are you?

I apologize again for asking this type of question, and thank you so much in advance.

This sounds even more direct and rude in English, but rest assured in Japanese it was asked very politely. This was done on April 28th, and the longer time went on, the more I started to doubt I would ever get a reply. Why would they reply with the 25K followers anyway? For this random (and rather direct) question out of nowhere?

But this morning, to my surprise, in came a reply (screen shot for proof):

初めまして。 左です。 お返事が遅くなってごめんなさい。 私のファンがたくさん居ると聞いて嬉しいです! そして私は男です! 36歳です! 失礼ではないですよ。 ご丁寧にありがとうございます。

They even provided their own translation with it:

How do you do? It’s the left. I’m sorry that an answer is late. My fan hears that there are many and is happy! And I’m a man! 36 years old! It isn’t impolite. Thank you very much politely.

Or, the more accurate translation (by me):

Hello, I am Hidari. I apologize for the late reply.

It really makes me happy knowing I have a lot of fans [out there]!

To answer your question: I am a man! And 36 years old! It was not a rude question at all (but thank you for taking that into consideration).

And so there we have it, straight from the Hidari’s mouth (or, keyboard I suppose). I figure that is probably the best proof to have.

So in summary:

After being unable to find anything really definitive, I just asked them directly (about their gender), to which they straight up replied: A 36 year old man.

Hope that helps people avoid mistakes in the future!


If you have any thoughts or questions, let me know below! I hope this can be sourced in the future if any debate arises on this issue.

Here is a summary image:

 

Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia Famitsu Review Translated

I translated the entire Famitsu review for Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valenta (Echoes: Another Hero King in Japan). It received an overall 37/40 rating from four reviewers. The break down was 9/9/10/9. I post a translated image, but the transcript can be found after for reference. It is from the April 13 2017 issue of Famitsu.

A big thank you to VincentASM of serenesforest for providing the review scan! Look forward to serenesforest’s own view on the review and other info gained before the game releases next week.

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