How did Mitsuha (as Taki) talk to his friends in “Your Name”‘s English Dub? [JPN vs ENG]

Note: there are very minor spoilers here, as it addresses something in the first half hour of the movie.

Your Name (named 君の名は Kimi no Na Wa in Japanese) is an anime movie and pretty big hit here in Japan, and doing well overseas too. It has gotten an official English dub that had been released outside of Japan sometime after the original version.

When I heard there was going to be a dub, I got curious about how they would handle translating some things. One of them was that a scene in the Japanese version that relied on pronouns in Japanese as well as dialect inflection.

So, when the dub came out, I hunted down the scene to see how they handled it. Let’s take a look!

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FE: Radiant Dawn: “What does that ‘Moldy Onions!’ guy say in Japanese?” [JPN vs ENG]

Awhile back I looked into a silly line from Path of Radiance which featured a soldier who had amused fans by saying “eat rock!”

A commenter wondered about another soldier line, this time from the sequel, Radiant Dawn.

I’m still wondering where they got “Mouldy onions!” from in Radiant Dawn. Like… Why…?

So I finally got around to taking a look!

Japanese English (Literal) English (Localization)
くそっ、どこへ行った Dammit, where’d they go?! Moldy onions! Where’d they go?!

*Note: The above Japanese line is from the basic game script The extended dialogue does not change it significantly, so is omitted.

Pretty straightforward, as you can see! The meanings are quite close, with one word simply changed.

In Japanese, the word “kuso!” (くそっ) is often used as a form of exasperation, like in English with curse words along the line of “dammit!” If you watch anime, you probably hear it a lot.

Of course depending on the context, intonation, etc. It can be anywhere from a tame “darn!” to the other extreme (“f***!”) In this case, the “dammit” is probably the most accurate given the situation.

In the end, they decided to go with “Moldy onions!” which I think is a great way to work around the problem entirely as to which degree of exasperation to work with. It can be taken as harshly or lightly as the reader figures, rather than leaving it to the localizer to have to work out. Probably a good approach in this case when considering the audience and ESRB/age ratings they have to adhere to.

Oddly, though, there are plenty of cases of other characters saying “Damn it!” in some fashion throughout the game.

For example:

Zelgius: Damn it! They’ve been captured!

Tibarn: Damn. Fine, I’ll carry you. Don’t get thrown off, kid. You better hang on tight.

Skrimir: We will return and regroup. It pains me, but we must. Damn it, Ranulf… He…got my leg.

Sothe: …Damn it.

Seeing the above, it is possible they interpreted kuso in that context to be some degrees higher in exasperation (perhaps more toward “sh*t!”) and so went with moldy onions, rather than damn which they had been using throughout the game.

Of course another possibility is separate translators who just interpreted things differently, as the rest of the above are from outside of Part 1 of the game, where this line is.

Or, really, they just wanted to make this guy silly like the “eat rock!” guy for no reason beyond amusement!

A lot of possibilities we may never know…

 


Well that does it for this brief comparison! I gained access to the Japanese text in both the Tellius games so hope to look into some other things in the future.

If you have any suggestions of what else to look into that you may be curious about, please feel free to leave a comment below!

Lastly, here is an infographic that summarizes this article.

 

 

Zelda: Does Ganondorf have a surname in the Japanese ALttP manual too? [JPN/ENG]

A reader sent me a question a few weeks ago that I had a chance to look into now.

Nintendo updated its Zelda website to include a profile of Ganon that refers to him as “Ganondorf Dragmire.” I heard this was also in A Link to the Past‘s game manual. Was there any mention of the name or some other surname in Japanese?

Zelda Legends thankfully had scanned copies of the manual for the game both in Japanese and English which I used in reference for this post. So let’s take a look:

The dialogue is highlighted in Japanese (left) and English (right).

In Japanese: He is simply ガノンドロフ and ガノン (Ganondorf and Ganon respectively). He has the title of an Evil King/King of Thieves/etc, but no mention of a surname of any sort.

The English above is straightforward, mentioning both Dragmire and Mandrag as other names.

So, no, the Japanese manual did not make a mention of this surname at all, and it is likely a localization creation that the site decided to stick with!


Comparisons are always fun! I hope this post can be used in reference for those who may not be aware of the lack of surname in Japanese.

Let me know if there’s anything you’d love to have looked into. Feel free to leave any comments below!

 

Pokémon B2/W2: Is Nursery Aide June really a man? [JPN vs ENG] (Revisited)

I made a post a few weeks ago regarding Nursery Aide June and whether she is really a he or not.

In it, I stated that one limitation was that I was unsure whether or not the second dialogue (meaning when you revisit said character) is different than first. So, I ended up comparing first dialogue (English) with second dialogue (Japanese). I assumed that the dialogue would be similar, but it was actually different.

A twitter user named @technickal101 provided me with a video of the second dialogue, so now I can take a look at the direct comparison!


I was sent a question by one of my readers who was curious to know something:

“In Pokémon: Black 2 / White 2, there is a Nursey Aide named June who you face only as a male trainer at the Rondez-View Ferris wheel in the summertime. Bulbapedia trivia says they’re actually a man in Japanese! Is that true? If so can you provide the dialogue?”

I had played the game as a female trainer, so never encountered or heard about such a character. Upon doing some research, she only appears for the male trainer. Many others (including Bulbapedia’s trivia section) made the same claim the reader was curious about, but there was never any exact dialogue presented. So! I decided to hunt down the scene in both languages and present them side by side here for our reference!

For reference, this is a Nursery Aide (ほいくし in Japanese). Her name is June in English, and Enatsu (エナツ) in Japanese.

Now let’s look at the dialogue! (Apologies in advance for the dialogue spacing. There is only so much a free blog’s interface can do).

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Zelda – Windwaker: Is the “Hero’s New Clothes” a reference to “The Emperor’s New Clothes?” [JPN vs ENG]

heronewclothest

My friends over at Source Gaming are doing a special Zelda week (February 22nd through March 1st) to celebrate the upcoming release of Breath of the Wild on the Switch.

They have made plenty of Zelda-themed content for the week, such as various facts about the first game of the series, and a piece on defending Skyward Sword  from backlash.

So, today, on my end, I look at a great example of localization found within Windwaker. The localization team behind the game managed to place a fitting cultural reference to an old story in an appropriately humorous moment in the game.

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Zelda – Ocarina of Time: How does Ruto refer to Sheik in Japanese? [JPN vs ENG]

My friends over at Source Gaming are doing a special Zelda week (February 22nd through March 1st) to celebrate the upcoming release of Breath of the Wild on the Switch.

They have written various articles already, from interviews with known Zelda speedrunners to discussing what new Zelda characters could be added to Hyrule Warriors.

So, today I decided to take a look at a hotly debated topic: Sheik’s gender!

But! I am not looking at the debate as a whole. Rather, I am simply looking at two lines of dialogue that are often referred to that caused said debate.

I do not explain the debate in great detail or all the arguments, nor do I really take any sides on it. I am simply looking at two bits of dialogue that are often cited when talking about it.

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FE: Path of Radiance: “What does that ‘Eat Rock’ guy say in Japanese?” [JPN vs ENG]

eatrockman

When I was playing through Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance (FE9) again a few months ago, I came across this particularly silly line that many fans (and I) find amusing.

I was curious as to what he said in Japanese, and managed to get hold of the Japanese game script to check just that!

The dialogue in question is from Chapter 25 of Path of Radiance (Strange Lands). It occurs in the scene right after you beat the level.

For those unaware, that map features traps and boulders that the enemy tries to roll down atop you. So when the group thinks they’ve cleared the field of enemies, along comes this guy…

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